Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure
Apr08

Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure

It’s with great pleasure that I announce that I’m now booking a second photo tour in South America in 2015! Since the booking for the first workshop – which is taking place in Peru, May 2015 – has been so successful, we decided to add another date to accommodate the people that couldn’t make the first trip’s dates.  Specifically, we had in mind the many teachers who let us know that they could only come in the summer months.  Well, here’s your chance. Get all the booking info here. A Bolivian Twist This tour, which will run starting July 13th in Cusco, Peru will not be the exact same workshop as the previous, however, as well be adding a Bolivian twist to it all. The tour will commence in Cusco, Peru where we will visit famous Peruvian sites like Ollantaytambo, Lake Titicaca and, of course, Machu Picchu.  From there, we will work into Bolivia and experience some incredible places such as the Uyuni Salt Flats, the Potosi Mines, and the great city of La Paz. All of the places we visit on this trip are tremendously photogenic, and we’re going to have a blast.  I hope you join us! Dates and Prices Start Date: July 13, 2015 in Cusco, Peru End Date: July 26, 2015 in La Paz, Peru Cost Per Person: $2,990usd For more information on the itinerary, FAQs, and what’s included in the tour, please head over to the info page for the photo workshop on Adventure.com What’s a Photography Workshop? I can’t speak for all photography workshops, because everyone operates differently.  However, in our workshops the goal is to have a genuine travel experience well not feeling rushed to take our photos, as well being in the right places at the right time for photography.  Moreover, these photo workshops give participants a look into what life is like as a professional travel photographer.   Our workshops also include 1-on-1 time with the professional photographers to discuss things like photo editing, and to do image critiques.  Of course, a big part of a photography tour is also meeting other people who have a passion for photography. So, whether you’re a professional photographer looking to build your portfolio quickly, an amateur photographer thinking about making the jump to pro, or just a hobbyist that doesn’t want to feel rush in the hobby, these trips are for you. More Information If you need some more information from me directly, you can always get a hold of me on my contact page.  So, if you have any questions, feel free to shoot me a quick...

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Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure
Apr01

Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure

It’s with great pleasure that I announce that I’m now booking a second photo tour in South America in 2015! Since the booking for the first workshop – which is taking place in Peru, May 2015 – has been so successful, we decided to add another date to accommodate the people that couldn’t make the first trip’s dates.  Specifically, we had in mind the many teachers who let us know that they could only come in the summer months.  Well, here’s your chance. Get all the booking info here. A Bolivian Twist This tour, which will run starting July 13th in Cusco, Peru will not be the exact same workshop as the previous, however, as well be adding a Bolivian twist to it all. The tour will commence in Cusco, Peru where we will visit famous Peruvian sites like Ollantaytambo, Lake Titicaca and, of course, Machu Picchu.  From there, we will work into Bolivia and experience some incredible places such as the Uyuni Salt Flats, the Potosi Mines, and the great city of La Paz. All of the places we visit on this trip are tremendously photogenic, and we’re going to have a blast.  I hope you join us! Dates and Prices Start Date: July 13, 2015 in Cusco, Peru End Date: July 26, 2015 in La Paz, Bolivia Cost Per Person: $2,990usd For more information on the itinerary, FAQs, and what’s included in the tour, please head over to the info page for the photo workshop on Adventure.com What’s a Photography Workshop? I can’t speak for all photography workshops, because everyone operates differently.  However, in our workshops the goal is to have a genuine travel experience well not feeling rushed to take our photos, as well being in the right places at the right time for photography.  Moreover, these photo workshops give participants a look into what life is like as a professional travel photographer.   Our workshops also include 1-on-1 time with the professional photographers to discuss things like photo editing, and to do image critiques.  Of course, a big part of a photography tour is also meeting other people who have a passion for photography. So, whether you’re a professional photographer looking to build your portfolio quickly, an amateur photographer thinking about making the jump to pro, or just a hobbyist that doesn’t want to feel rush in the hobby, these trips are for you. More Information If you need some more information from me directly, you can always get a hold of me on my contact page.  So, if you have any questions, feel free to shoot me a quick...

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Dogsledding Jasper and Editing the Images in PSE 13
Dec03

Dogsledding Jasper and Editing the Images in PSE 13

Yeah! I’m doing stuff again, look at me!  Sitting around Alberta has been good from a work side of things, but from a fun side of things I’ve been itching to get out and playing around a bit more.  So, I was so excited for the opportunity to head out dogsledding from Jasper National Park this week.  Of course, it wasn’t easy.  The weather in Jasper this week was nuts.  We had a massive snow storm – which you saw in my video skiing at Marmot Basin – and the snow was followed by temperatures between minus 20 and minus 37.  In fact, the dogsledding nearly got cancelled on us because it was too cold.  So, I want to give a massive thanks to the people at Cold Fire Creek Dog Sledding for making this happen despite the weather issues.  A big thanks is also due to our driver at SunDog Tours for getting us out there on those brutal ice roads.  As a former tour bus driver/guide (my university job), I know how stressful that can be. Anyways, check out the video below to see what we got up to.  Under the video, there’s plenty of info and lots of tips about taking winter photos.  In the video and this article, I guide you through the editing process of winter photography as well using photoshop elements 13.  Of course, there are plenty of images from the dogsledding in Jasper as well. How to Dogsled in Jasper National Park? It should be noted that dogsledding is actually not allowed within the boundaries of Jasper National Park.  However, if you’re in Jasper, you can organize dogsledding tours via a local adventure company called SunDog.  From town, they take you an hours drive to just outside the town of Valemount, BC where you meet the dogs and the crew at Cold Fire Creek Dog Sledding.  The trip we did was only an hour because of the extremely cold weather.  However, there are also opportunities to do trips as long as 4 hours which is what we were meant to do initially. The sled dogs aren’t the typical huskies you might expect.  Instead, these are dogs specifically bred for the purposes of pulling sleighs.  They are fast, and they are energetic.  It’s a serious amount of fun.  If you go, you have the opportunity to push the sled yourself, if you’d like.  Or, you can sit in the comfort of one of the sleds themselves covered in blankets and let the guides do the pushing for you.  Tiffany and I shared a sled, and took turns pushing and riding shotgun.  It was a blast. Tips...

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A Week in Iceland: Stats, Costs, and Travel Photography
Sep19

A Week in Iceland: Stats, Costs, and Travel Photography

When we were booking our flights from Europe to North America, we found that the cheapest flights across the Atlantic all stopped in Iceland. I remembered hearing that there was the option for free layovers in Iceland, and immediately decided that we needed to spend a day or two exploring since we had the chance. Of course, two days turned into seven, and instead of just seeing some sights in the south, we chose to attempt to drive the entire ring road and throw in some detours as well. And well a week to drive the ring road in Iceland (a trip that can be done in about 16 hours of driving consecutive) might not sound too extreme, when you’re a travel photographer chasing light and stopping at every worthy sight, it’s a rush. Let’s just say, there wasn’t a lot of sleep happening in Iceland. How could we rest when there were so many amazing things to see and shoot. The video below shows off these sights plus some of the travel photography I shot during the trip. Below the video, there’s information on various stats, costs, and ways we went about making this happen. Getting Around Iceland We were very fortunate to work with a company called SadCars in Iceland. They are a rental car company that is geared towards the budget and backpack traveller, which is awesome. Rental cars in Iceland are extremely expensive, and it’s great that there’s an option like SadCars which provides an older, but still very serviceable, fleet that is rugged enough to get you around the island. I don’t need a 2015 SUV to get me around. Hell, I did Africa on a scooter. We had a Toyota Rav 4 which definitely did the trick. But man, did it burn some fuel! Anyways, if you get to Iceland, I can’t recommend SadCars enough. They will pick you up at the airport and drive you to there office 5 minutes away and get you sorted. Inside the airport, there were massive lines for the other rental car companies, so it was great not having to deal with that too. Quick Stats for a Week in Iceland Kilometers Travelled: Our trip meter read just under 2,000 kilometers when we arrived back in Reykjavik. Times I fell down a mountainside: Twice. I have the mud stains on my jeans and bruises on my knees to prove it. Times I got knocked over by the wind: Never!!! But at Dettifoss it sure felt like I was about to be blown off a ledge to my death. Nights Spent Camping: 3. We planned to camp more. However,...

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Photography Packing Guide for Iceland
Sep07

Photography Packing Guide for Iceland

The day has nearly arrived for me to leave on my week long adventure in Iceland.  Thus, I thought it would be a good opportunity for me to show you the photography gear that I’ll be packing for that trip.  Now, it’s also worth mentioning that as a permanent traveller, I am actually packing all my belongings with me; I have to, as I’m always on the road.  However, this guide is a more of an explanation of the photo gear that I’d be bringing if I was going on a one week or 2 week trip around Iceland.  It’s meant to be a tool for people heading to Iceland and hoping to shoot some great travel photography to use for their own preparation. To see all the photography gear and the explanation behind why I’m packing a certain item, check out the video below.  Beyond the video, I have a quick description of the gear as well.   Photography Gear for Iceland   Camera Bodies and Lenses Canon 60D: At the moment, I only have on camera body.  I’m shooting a crop sensor Canon 60D, but I’d prefer to be shooting a 6D if I had the money.  In the future, I’m hoping to upgrade and use this lens as a backup.  However, it’ll definitely do the trip in Iceland.   Sigma 10-20mm: The lens I’ll likely be using the most is a Sigma 10-20mm super-wide angle lens which is great for landscapes. If you’re shooting a full frame camera, you’ll need a full frame version of the lens like the Canon 16-35mm or 17-40mm.  If you wanted to get even wider, there’s also the Canon 14mm as well as some off-brand stuff as well.     Canon 70-20mm: I pack my 70-200mm f/2.8 IS lens with me everywhere, and Iceland will be no different.  This lens is versatile, fast, and as sharp as a penguin in a tuxedo.  This is a must lens for any situation, and any destination.     Sigma 18-50mm: I’ll likely use this lens to fill the gaps in Iceland when I want a bit more zoom than 20mm.  I’m sure that it will spend some time on my camera.  If you’re shooting full frame, this is equivalent to a 24-70mm.  A 24-105mm lens would also be a good option if you want more range and don’t carry a 70-200mm.     Canon 50mm: I’m not sure if this will hit my camera during the trip, but it’s so light that I bring it along everywhere anyways.  The lens is great for creating a nice shallow depth of field.  I can see myself using...

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On Location in Southern Mongolia and the Gobi Desert
Aug05

On Location in Southern Mongolia and the Gobi Desert

After taking in Naadam in Ulaanbaatar, our immediate goal was to get out of town. Sure, we loved Ulaanbaatar on arrival. It provided us with so many things we just couldn’t get during our 2 months in China; or our 7 months in Asia all together for that matter. The Mongolian capital is loaded with western restaurants catering to tourists and expats, there are a couple Irish pubs, and there’s unblocked wifi, what else could a weary travel photographer want? But, no one comes to Mongolia for the capital. It’s the countryside that draws people in, and it’s what we were lusting after. Our first trip out of the capital was to Southern Mongolia and the Gobi Desert. We booked an 8 day trip with Sun Path Hostel and Tours, and really had no idea what to expect. Unlike all other destinations I’ve been, I haven’t seen or heard much from Mongolia. In the end, the trip was just about everything you should expect from a trip to the Gobi Desert: it was tough at times, and amazing at others. The weather was beautiful at times, and other times it seemed hell bent on ruining our lives. Looking back, though, our trip through Southern Mongolia really couldn’t have gone better. We had a great time, met some awesome people, and had as many photography opportunities as anywhere we’ve been in a long time. Check out the video for a bit of an on location look in to the trip. There are photos and more information from the trip below it all. Booking a Tour to the Gobi Desert What we found the most difficult about Mongolia, at first, was that the onus to find group members to travel with is often on you. Tour companies will sell you tours every single day, but they charge a different rate depending on how many people are going. It’s a bit of a pain. Moreover, none of the hostels work together, so there’s nothing regularly scheduled. It’s 100% on the tourists to organize themselves into groups. In the end, we went with Sun Path Hostel. Not only were they by far the cheapest tour company going to the Gobi Desert, but they were the only company that had regularly departing tours and didn’t force you to go searching the streets for other people to join you on the tour. They made it quite easy. How Much does a Tour to the Gobi Cost? For our 8 day trip to the Gobi, we paid $55 per day, per person. That price included a driver, an English-speaking guide (who works more as a translator,...

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